Monday, August 02, 2010

The Best Pickle Recipe I've Ever Eaten

I promised a friend that I'd post the absolute best pickle recipe we've tried yet. So here it is. I love dill pickles but I hate soft ones. They gotta have CRUNCH! This is the only recipe that we've tried in over 10 years of trying recipes that gives the desired crunch and has all the garlic and dill flavor we like.

8# 3"-4" long pickling cucumbers
4 cups white vinegar
12 cups water
2/3 cup pickling salt
16 cloves garlic, peeld and halved
8 sprigs fresh dill weed
8 heads fresh dill weed

  1. Wash cucumbers and place in the sink (or bathtub for larger batches) [Leslie yelled in, "use big coolers, the ice doesn't melt as fast"] with cold water and lots of ice cubes. Soak in ice water for at least 2 hours but no more than 8 hours. Refresh as required. Sterilize 8 (1 quart) canning jars and lids in boiling water for at least 10 minutes.
  2. In a large pot over medium-high heat, combine the vinegar, water, and pickling salt. Bring the brine to a rapid boil.
  3. In each jar, place 2 half-cloves of garlic, one head of dill, then enough cucumbers to fill the jar (about 1 pound). Then add 2 more garlic halves, and 1 sprig of dill. Fill jars. with hot brine. Seal jars, making sure you have cleaned the jar's rims of any residue.
  4. Process sealed jars in a boiling water bath. Process quart jars for 15 minutes.
  5. Store pickles for a minimum of 8 weeks (we can never wait past 6 but they are better at 8) before eating. Refrigerate after opening. Pickles will keep for up to 2 years if stored in a cool dry place.
  6. Enjoy!


Anonymous said...

Love, love, love this recipe!!! It was my first attempt at pickling and I think it will be a family event from here on out! Thank you for the post!!

Anonymous said...

The recipe is almost identical to my best recipe.
The ice bath is crucial! The four secrets to crispy dills are:
1. Ice water
2. Cucumbers picked within the past 24 hours
3. Nick the blossom end off with a potato peeler
4. Add a grape leaf to the bottom layer
Alum is sometimes attributed to crispiness,
but usually only found in the old Grandma recipes.
Mine also have a orange habanero pepper floating
in there somewhere.